Tuesday, March 13, 2018

LOL !! Man Pens Down a Hilarious Note to his Pregnant Dog Who Made a Wrong Decision

                 Man pens down a hilarious note to his pregnant dog who made a wrong decision lailasnews
Jimmy Peralta, a heartbroken Instagram took to the platform to pen down a hilarious note to his dog who had a pregnancy photoshoot, shortly after she made a ‘wrong decision’ of giving her body and soul to the dog next door. The man who said he will be present to support his dog through labour, said she made a wrong decision at such a young age. His hilarious post read;

Man pens down a hilarious note to his dog who made a wrong decision lailasnews 1
Man pens down a hilarious note to his pregnant dog who made a wrong decision lailasnews 1
Man pens down a hilarious note to his pregnant dog who made a wrong decision lailasnews 5
However he went private after the post went viral, saying his dog wants her privacy to be respected.
Man pens down a hilarious note to his pregnant dog who made a wrong decision lailasnews 2

Much has been written about the human-animal bond, and the benefits it can bring to owners of companion animals.  Sometimes pets are portrayed as more-or-less interchangeable, as if it made little difference to the relationship whether the pet happens to be a cat, a dog, or a rabbit.  The emotional ties that owners feel towards their pets may be somewhat independent of the type of animal involved, but the way the animals feel about their owners will be markedly different from one species to another.  Moreover, these differences have profound implications for the well-being of animals that find themselves in a less-than-ideal relationship.
Psychology Today reported that Dogs have a much longer and more complete history of domestication.  Moreover, they are descended from a species, the grey wolf, which had already evolved a highly sophisticated social brain that was, evidently, ripe for adaptation to a life with mankind.  By eight thousand years ago, when cats were still making their first tentative steps towards eventual domestication, dogs had already diverged into multiple types, adapted for guarding, hunting and even as status objects.
Domestication wrought two major changes in their behaviour that were crucial to their adaptation to the domestic environment.  As they turned into dogs, they became much more tolerant of other members of their own species, unlike wolves, which are highly aggressive towards all but the members of their own pack.  They also gained a unique sensitivity towards human body language, gaze and gesture, enabling them to be trained to carry out a multitude of tasks, from herding to guarding to guiding.

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